The saying: “In God We Trust”

By: TXRB Staff | 16 Jan 2019

The saying: “In God We Trust”

You probably know by now that the phrase “In God We Trust” is the official motto of the
The United State of America. The phrase was adopted on July 30, 1956, as a replacement to the unofficial motto of “E Pluribus Unum” (“One out of many”). This phrase was modified from “In God is Our Trust”, and first appeared on the Two-Cent Coin in 1864. It was declared to be placed on all gold and silver coins by an Act of Congress a year later. This phrase was adopted to reaffirm the strong belief and religious faith in America’s heritage and future. “In God We Trust” became a controversial subject matter in the 21 st century when it was added to paper currency to help fight communism.

TuesdayTrivia-InGodWeTrust

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It should be noted that after the “In God We Trust” slogan was adopted as the official motto
of the United States, it first appeared on paper currency in 1957. Since then, it has been in
all currency in the United States. However, in 1908, Congress had mandated that the phrase
to be printed on all coins upon which it had previously appeared. This move was instituted
after a public outcry following the release of a $20 coin which did not bear the motto. It has
been in continuous use on the 1-cent coin since 1909, and on the 10-cent coin since 1916. It
also has appeared on all gold coins and silver dollar coins, half-dollar coins and quarter-
dollar coins struck since July 1, 1908. It disappeared from 5-cent coins in 1883 and did not
appear again until production of the Jefferson nickel began in 1938. Since then, all U.S. coins have borne the motto. During the President’s First State of the Union address on January 30, 2017, the phrase “In God We Trust” was likened as the American way to place faith and family, not government and bureaucracy, at the center of the American life and lifestyle.

The phrase affects all areas of financial operation in the United States including local
banking, operations, and monetary transactions as coins and paper currency exchanges
hands.

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